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On August 21st, 2017, DSCOVR EPIC captured a total solar eclipse over North America.

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On February 26th, 2017, DSCOVR EPIC captured an annular solar eclipse over South America.

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July 05, 2016. On July 5th, 2016, the moon again passed between DSCOVR and the Earth. EPIC snapped these images over a period of about 4 hours. In this set, the far side of the moon, which is never seen from Earth, passes by. In the backdrop, Earth rotates, starting with the Australia and Pacific and gradually revealing Asia and Africa.

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On March 15, 2016, over a span of 5 hours, DSCOVR EPIC imaged Jupiter. This activity was done for purposes of instrument characterization, but also provides a unique view of our solar system's largest planet and its moons. Because of the long time span and the techniques required to do the imaging, it was not possible to do regular color images. Instead, the color information was extracted from the relevant bands and applied to the 443nm (blue) channel in order to provide the colorized rendition. Below is the labeled version of the colorized 443nm band, the original 443nm band, and the unlabeled colorized 443nm band.

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A total solar eclipse starting on March 9 00:15 UTC and ending on March 9 03:38 UTC was visible only from the South Pacific. The DSCOVR EPIC camera was following the shadow cast by the moon on Earth during this time from its vantage point at the Sun-Earth first Lagrange point. Note that the total eclipse is limited to the center black area of the shadow. The outer regions experienced a partial eclipse with a portion of the sun’s disk always visible. Hence some surface features and clouds can be identified.

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Video of the lunar occlusion event as captured by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC).

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Reprocessed images and movie of the transit of the moon in front of the full sunlit disk of Earth captured by NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on board NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) on July 16, 2015. The transit lasted from 16:30 EDT to 20:10 EDT. Since DSCOVR is not exactly on the Sun-Earth line, this event is not a solar eclipse.

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Reprocessed version of the first light image of North and Central America made by the DSCOVR EPIC camera on July 6, 2015. Clouds cover most of the hemisphere. The central turquoise areas are shallow seas around the Caribbean islands. The brighter circular area in the image’s center is caused by sun light reflected from the ocean surface (sun glint).

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